Tyler Robbins Fitness

Tyler Robbins has his B.Sc. in Biochemistry: Pre-Medical, is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), is certified through USA Weightlifting, and a CrossFit Level 2 Trainer.

Learn all about your glutes

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluteus_maximus_muscle

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluteus_maximus_muscle

Your glutes consist of 3 different muscles; the gluteus maximus (right, in yellow), the gluteus medius (right, in blue), and the gluteus minimus (right, in red).

The gluteus maximus, the largest and most superficial of the gluteals and one of the largest muscles in the human body gives shape to our hips and buttocks. This is one of the most important muscles in the body because not only does it aid in keeping us erect and upright, but it is able to generate very large forces for athletic movements. It originates (attaches) at the gluteal surface of the ilium (back side of pelvis) and the sacrum. It inserts on the femur and iliotibial tract.

The gluteus medius, the second largest muscle of the gluteals, also originates to the gluteal surface of the ilium just beneath the gluteus maximus. However, unlike the glute maximus, the medius inserts on the greater trochanter (head of the femur).

Finally, the smallest of the gluteals; the gluteus minimus, originates at the gluteal surface of the pelvis just beneath the gluteus medius, and inserts on the head of the femur.

Function

Gluteus Maximus

  • External rotation (femur)
  • Extension of the hip (while standing)
  • Abduction of the hip
  • Extension of the hip (from a squat)

Gluteus Medius

  • Abduction of the hip (also preventing adducting of the hip)
  • Medial rotation of the thigh

Gluteus Minimus

  • Abduction of the hip (also preventing adducting of the hip)
  • Medial rotation of the thigh

External Rotation (femur)

Extension (from standing)

Abduction

Extension (from a squat)

Medial Rotation (of femur)