Tyler Robbins Fitness

B.Sc. Biochemistry, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), Certified CrossFit Trainer (CCFT/CF-L3), USA Weightlifting Level 1

Filtering by Tag: Recovery

Back to Basics: Recovery Day 1

The goal of this recovery workout is to increase circulation to many of the primary and secondary movers from the previous days' workout, increase range of motion and flexibility, and finally work on some core strength. You will gain much of your core strength and stability from squatting, deadlifting, overhead pressing, etc. but I believe that extra core-specific work is beneficial to keep a solid midsection, improving overall health and strength.

Warm-up

The warm-up is actually a series of mini-complexes. Each complex is to be done sequentially in its entirety before moving on to the next complex.

For example, if there are 3 exercises in the first complex, and you are to complete 3 sets of each exercise, it would look something like this:

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Break periods should be kept relatively short, moving from one exercise to the next in a timely manner.

Here are the complexes:

Warm-up 1
Band Shoulder Rotations (Lateral) 3x10/arm
High Knee Walk to Spiderman, with Hip Lift 3x6
Face Pull with Scapular Retraction 3x10

Warm-up 2
Hip Complex (6 exercises) 1x10 reps/exercise/leg

Warm-up 3
Roller Angel 3x10
Seated Pidgeon 3x30secs./leg
Band Pull-aparts (horizontal) 3x10

Warm-up 4
Toe Raise Stretch to Back Lunge 3x8/leg
Spider Lunges 3x8/leg

I by no means expect you to know how to do all of these exercises so make sure to watch the following video on how they are done.

Complex

Similar to the mini-complexes above, this complex should be done as a circuit, completing all 3 exercises sequentially before repeating for 3 total sets. Use the above video to learn how to do each exercise.

Ab Wheel Roll-out 3x12-15
An ab wheel is a very inexpensive tool to add to your gym or workout tool kit. If you don't already have one, this is the one I have (no affiliation). The goal with an ab roll-out is to train the core to do something that it is naturally intended to do - resist extension. Far too many core exercises promote torso flexion, an ab wheel will definitely challenge you in new ways!

Push-ups 3x12-15
Use whatever variety of push-up you wish here. Keep the repetitions lower (15 or less). I recommend intensifying by including instability rather than added resistance.

Rear Delt Raise 3x12-15
The rear delts are worked throughout this program via barbell rows as well as the mobility work during the warm-ups and recovery routines. Having said that, I really like this exercise to not only aid in stabilizing the shoulder but for aesthetics as well.

Foam Rolling

If you haven't already started, I highly recommend using foam rolling (myofascial release) as part of your recovery. Foam rolling at the end of the recovery day workouts is a perfect time to do so as your muscles and body are warm. I don't recommend foam rolling prior to the strength workouts as some research has shown that myofascial release can hinder strength output.

This looks just like the foam roller I have (no affiliation).





Back to Basics: Recovery Day 2

The goal of this recovery workout is to increase circulation to many of the primary and secondary movers from the previous days' workout, increase range of motion and flexibility, and finally work on some core strength. You will gain much of your core strength and stability from squatting, deadlifting, overhead pressing, etc. but I believe that extra core-specific work is beneficial to keep a solid midsection, improving overall health and strength.

Warm-up

The warm-up is actually a series of mini-complexes. Each complex is to be done sequentially in its entirety before moving on to the next complex.

For example, if there are 3 exercises in the first complex, and you are to complete 3 sets of each exercise, it would look something like this:

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Break periods should be kept relatively short, moving from one exercise to the next in a timely manner.

Here are the complexes:

Warm-up 1
Band Shoulder Rotations (Vertical) 3x10/arm
Walking Twisting Lunges 3x10
High Knee Walk to Spiderman with Hip Lift 3x6

Warm-up 2
Side Bridge Lift 2x30s

Warm-up 3
Roller Angel 3x10
Band Pull-downs 3x10

Warm-up 4
Figure-4 Sequence 1x4 pos.

Warm-up 5
Child's Pose 2x30s
orld's Greatest Stretch 2x4/leg

I by no means expect you to know how to do all of these exercises so make sure to watch the following video on how they are done.

Complex

Similar to the mini-complexes above, this complex should be done as a circuit, completing all 3 exercises sequentially before repeating for 3 total sets. Use the above video to learn how to do each exercise.

Hanging "L's" 3x12-15
Squat Cross Reach 3x8/leg
Stir the Pot with Knee Raise 3x12-15

Foam Rolling

If you haven't already started, I highly recommend using foam rolling (myofascial release) as part of your recovery. Foam rolling at the end of the recovery day workouts is a perfect time to do so as your muscles and body are warm. I don't recommend foam rolling prior to the strength workouts as some research has shown that myofascial release can hinder strength output.

This looks just like the foam roller I have (no affiliation).





Back to Basics: Recovery Day 3

The goal of this recovery workout is to increase circulation to many of the primary and secondary movers from the previous days' workout, increase range of motion and flexibility, and finally work on some core strength. You will gain much of your core strength and stability from squatting, deadlifting, overhead pressing, etc. but I believe that extra core-specific work is beneficial to keep a solid midsection, improving overall health and strength.

Warm-up

The warm-up is actually a series of mini-complexes. Each complex is to be done sequentially in its entirety before moving on to the next complex.

For example, if there are 3 exercises in the first complex, and you are to complete 3 sets of each exercise, it would look something like this:

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Break periods should be kept relatively short, moving from one exercise to the next in a timely manner.

Here are the complexes:

Warm-up 1
Band Shoulder Rotations (Lateral) 3x10/arm
High Knee Walk to Spiderman, with Hip Lift 3x6
Face Pull with Scapular Retraction 3x10

Warm-up 2
Hip Complex (6 exercises) 1x10 reps/exercise/leg

Warm-up 3
Roller Angel 3x10
Seated Pidgeon 3x30secs./leg
Band Pull-aparts (horizontal) 3x10

Warm-up 4
Toe Raise Stretch to Back Lunge 3x8/leg
Spider Lunges 3x8/leg

I by no means expect you to know how to do all of these exercises so make sure to watch the following video on how they are done.

Complex

Similar to the mini-complexes above, this complex should be done as a circuit, completing all 3 exercises sequentially before repeating for 3 total sets. Use the above video to learn how to do each exercise.

Windshield Wipers 3x12-15
Warrior 3 Row Press 3x8/side
Hanging Up and Overs 3x12-15

Foam Rolling

If you haven't already started, I highly recommend using foam rolling (myofascial release) as part of your recovery. Foam rolling at the end of the recovery day workouts is a perfect time to do so as your muscles and body are warm. I don't recommend foam rolling prior to the strength workouts as some research has shown that myofascial release can hinder strength output.

This looks just like the foam roller I have (no affiliation).





Back to Basics: Recovery Day 4

The goal of this recovery workout is to increase circulation to many of the primary and secondary movers from the previous days' workout, increase range of motion and flexibility, and finally work on some core strength. You will gain much of your core strength and stability from squatting, deadlifting, overhead pressing, etc. but I believe that extra core-specific work is beneficial to keep a solid midsection, improving overall health and strength.

Warm-up

The warm-up is actually a series of mini-complexes. Each complex is to be done sequentially in its entirety before moving on to the next complex.

For example, if there are 3 exercises in the first complex, and you are to complete 3 sets of each exercise, it would look something like this:

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3

Break periods should be kept relatively short, moving from one exercise to the next in a timely manner.

Here are the complexes:

Warm-up 1
Band Shoulder Rotations (Vertical) 3x10/arm
Walking Twisting Lunges 3x10
High Knee Walk to Spiderman with Hip Lift 3x6

Warm-up 2
Side Bridge Lift 2x30s

Warm-up 3
Roller Angel 3x10
Band Pull-downs 3x10

Warm-up 4
Figure-4 Sequence 1x4 pos.

Warm-up 5
Child's Pose 2x30s
World's Greatest Stretch 2x4/leg

I by no means expect you to know how to do all of these exercises so make sure to watch the following video on how they are done.

Complex

Similar to the mini-complexes above, this complex should be done as a circuit, completing all 3 exercises sequentially before repeating for 3 total sets. Use the above video to learn how to do each exercise.

Stability Ball Pike Roll-out 3x12-15
Lunge Kneel Knee Raise 3x8/side
Banana Kayak Twist 3x12-15

Foam Rolling

If you haven't already started, I highly recommend using foam rolling (myofascial release) as part of your recovery. Foam rolling at the end of the recovery day workouts is a perfect time to do so as your muscles and body are warm. I don't recommend foam rolling prior to the strength workouts as some research has shown that myofascial release can hinder strength output.

This looks just like the foam roller I have (no affiliation).





Healing and Recovery

Since I am in my "transition" or "recovery" week, I figured it would be a great time to list some advice on how to maximize your recovery efforts:

raymond_george-costanza-shrinkage.jpg
  1. Take antioxidants – Green tea catechins and N-acetyl-cystein. Both are powerful antioxidants, they reduce muscle soreness and they’re awesome for your health. Shakeology has tons of antioxidants.
  2. Eat fish or supplement with fish oil – This will allow you to move better and you’ll end up being less sore. If your muscles and connective tissues are the gears and cogs that move your body, fish oil is the grease that keeps everything running smoothly.
  3. "I was in the pool!" - Cold showers and/or baths help alleviate sore muscles. Just remember to lock your door when you are changing...
  4. Protein - Helps your muscles re-build. Make sure you are taking in proper amounts of protein throughout the day from a variety of sources.
  5. Carbohydrates - Immediately following a workout. This helps replenish spent glycogen stores helping with recovery. 
  6. Casein Protein - I like to eat cottage cheese before bed. Cottage cheese contains casein protein, a slower-digesting protein, to help repair and rebuild sore/broken-down muscles as your sleep! 
  7. Sleep - Ah yes, one of the most under-utilized recovery tools in your arsenal. Too many people sleep far too little.  If you feel like napping (and have time for it), do that too!
  8. Stretch - Stretching helps improve range of motion, but it also allows the tired and/or repairing muscle fibers to open up to better circulation, thus improving recovery.